Project Type: Studio Works

Bloodline-Holly Wilson

Bloodline

BLOODLINE

29″ x 22′ x 9″, Unique Cast Bronze with Patina and Locust Wood

It is the stories of family, history, and identity that brought me to “Bloodline”. It is a long trail of my Native American history, my bloodline. To be ‘on the Rolls’ as an American Indian you must prove a quantum of blood verified through birth and death records until you match up to a name on the official “Dawes Rolls.” As I began walking through the past to document my blood, with the names and some faces, I wanted to hear them speak and tell their story. I wanted them to be counted.

The figures walk across a Locust tree base that came down in a storm. It is cut lengthwise exposing the rough center revealing the lines that show its life and history. I de-barked the exterior but kept the curve of the tree and its raw surface. You see the figures walking through time—their life above and the tree’s life below.

The Cigar Figures come from a childhood Native American story that my mother told of the “Stick People.” The “Stick People” would run through the night and call your name; if you went with them, you were never heard from again. She never described the figures and I was always drawn to the idea of what they looked like. The Cigar Figures are my reimagining of that story, now a story of family and my past—a complicated narrative of loss, survival, and resilience. The figures are made from real cigars and found sticks cast in bronze. The faces are of the ancestors from my past as far back as I can trace.

There are sections for each generation, beginning with my children. Though I only have two, there are five figures. Each life is counted and the children who did not survive are remembered with a place on the wood in history; their forms small and their heads bowed. Next, I have my section with my sisters and brother followed by my mother’s and father’s history weaving back and forth. When hung, the light casts a shadow of the figures on the wall. This shadow represents memory for me. Like a shadow, these memories cannot be held, and in the end, we are all only a shadow in history, shadows on this earth.

Bloodline at Gilcrease Museum

For inquiries, please contact:

The Studio
Mustang, OK 73064 | 405.308.0239

Exhibition History

  • Weaving History into Art: The Enduring Legacy of Shan Goshorn, Gilcrease Museum (October 9, 2020 – March 28, 2021)
  • On Turtle’s Back, Dunedin Fine Art Center, Dunedin, FL (Sept 13, 2019 -December 23, 2019)
  • On Turtle’s Back, Museum of Contemporary Native Art, Santa Fe NM (May 25 2018-January 27, 2019)
  • Holly Wilson: Talk Story, C.N. Gorman Museum, University of California-Davis (January 9-March 16, 2018)
  • Art Prize 9, Grand Rapids MI (September 20-October 7, 2017)
  • Four by Four 2016: Midwest Invitational Exhibition, Springfield Art Museum, Springfield, Missouri (September 10 – December 4, 2016)
  • A Foot in Two Worlds, Oklahoma Contemporary, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (June 18 – August 21, 2015)
Bloodline Holly Wilson
Bloodline Holly Wilson

Bloodline-Holly Wilson

Bloodline-Holly Wilson

Bloodline-Holly Wilson

SpringField Art Museum, “Bloodline” by Holly Wilson
Bloodline by Holly Wilson
Bloodline at Gilcrease Museum

Bloodline, Keeper of the Seeds

Bloodline, Keeper of the Seeds
2021, 30″ x 98″ x 18″ in, Unique cast bronze with patina, cedar, and steel

It is a matriarchal society that my family lineage comes from; the woman cared for the children and the stories of their family. They told the history and planted the seeds for the next generation. Their lives, my life, and that of my daughter are full of the twists and turns that women hold in our society.

The Cigar Figures come from a childhood Native American story that my mother told of the “Stick People.” The “Stick People” would run through the night and call your name; if you went with them, you were never heard from again. She never described the figures, and I was always drawn to the idea of what they looked like. The Cigar Figures are my reimagining of that story, now a story of family and my past—a complicated narrative of loss, survival, and resilience. The figures are made from real cigars and found sticks, all cast in bronze. The faces are of the ancestors and family shaped from the idea of a cameo or silhouette painting to capture the faces of the families.

When hung, the light casts a shadow of the figures on the wall. This shadow represents memory for me. Like a shadow, these memories cannot be held, and in the end, we are all only a shadow in history, shadows on this earth.

Available

For inquiries, please contact:

Bonner David Galleries

22 E. 81 ST | New York City, New York 10028 | 929.226.7800 | www.bdgartboutique.com
7040 E. Main Street | Scottsdale, Arizona 85251 | 480.941.8500 | www.BonnerDavid.com

 

Bloodline Keeper of the Seeds
Bloodline Keeper of the Seeds

A View From Within Under the Skin

A View From Within Under The Skin

2016, 9’ x 12’ x 1.5”, Crayola Crayon

There are 12 girls, and each girl is made in 24 colors from a Crayola Crayon box making a total 288 girls.

 

I think if we could see ourselves as all the colors in the crayon box in all the shades, we could be kinder we would be able to feel if just for a moment another’s life and our world could change in such a way that children would not worry about if they are too light or too dark to belong. We are more than a classification in terms of a position between two extremes, I see the light within us all and the variations that make each of us, we are all the colors and an untold number of possibilities.

The way we see others and how one is seen has been a subject that I have had in my life since I was small. I am both Native American and Caucasian, but growing up I felt more times than I care to count that I was not enough of one or the other and that pull made me question all parts of myself. If I did not look like _____ could I be ______? Where did I fit if I was not a part of this or that group? I have had conversations with many that are from other races and nationality and they too have struggled. Is my skin too dark or not dark enough, the texture of my hair or the accent that one hears when I speak. All this history, this past came to a head one day while getting my children ready for school we were pulling together pencils, colored pencils, folders, and crayons. They had to have 4 sets of 24 crayons each and we had leftovers from sets of the past years, some colors had never been used, and we were combining them together so we’d know how many new boxes would be required. The kids were talking about their friends at the new school and friends of their past school. In the conversation, they were describing the children “the girl with a big laugh, she has yellow hair, or the boy I ate lunch with, he was a helper and he told the funniest stories”, in a very casual descriptive manner with no malice to the differences. This made me think more about how we see people and how one is judged. The smell of the crayons, the vivid colors, and the thoughts of my youth brought me to this crayon project. How we change in our viewpoints of people, and how we judge people based on race and color. We are all one below that surface, that surface of skin, no matter the color, the shape, or the origin.

For inquiries, please contact:

The Studio
11400 Riverview | Mustang, OK 73064 | 405.308.0239

Exhibition History

  • Weaving History into Art: The Enduring Legacy of Shan Goshorn, Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa, OK (October 9, 2020 – March 28, 2021)
  • On Turtle’s Back, Dunedin Fine Art Center, Dunedin, FL (Sept 13, 2019 -December 23, 2019)
  • Monarchs: Brown and Native Contemporary Artists in the Path of the Butterfly, Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park, KS (March 7 – June 2, 2019)
  • On Turtle’s Back, Museum of Contemporary Native Art, Santa Fe NM (May 25, 2018-January 27, 2019)
  • 21C Museum Hotels Oklahoma City (August 2017 – February 2018)
  • Four by Four 2016: Midwest Invitational Exhibition, Springfield Art Museum, Springfield, Missouri (September 10 – December 4, 2016)
A View From Within Under The Skin by Holly Wilson
A View From Within Under The Skin by Holly Wilson
A View from Within Under The Skin
A View from Within Under The Skin

A View From Within Under The Skin - Detail by Holly Wilson
A View From Within Under The Skin – Detail by Holly Wilson

 

Coyote and the Anguish of Mortality-detail-Holly Wilson

Coyote and the Anguish of Mortality

“Coyote and the Anguish of Mortality”
Unique Cast Bronze with Patina, Cedar, 12” x 13.5”x 4.5”

Sold

For inquiries, please contact:
The Studio
Mustang, OK 73064 | 405.308.0239

Coyote and the Anguish of Mortality-Holly Wilson
Coyote and the Anguish of Mortality-shadow-Holly Wilson
Coyote and the Anguish of Mortality-sv 2-Holly Wilson
Coyote and the Anguish of Mortality-sv 2-Holly Wilson
Coyote and the Anguish of Mortality-sv 3- Holly Wilson
Coyote and the Anguish of Mortality-sv 3- Holly Wilson
Im Still Here-Holly Wilson

I’M STILL HERE

I’m Still Here

2017, 29”x 27”x 24”, Unique Cast Bronze with Patina, and flex cord

The boarding schools cut the hair and stole the language of Native American children. But inside, they were still there. My sister lost her hair to cancer and people stopped making eye contact, leaving her to feel invisible. But she was still there. The old tree was cut down, but its power to lead to the spirit world is still there. Through everything, they whisper, “I’m still here.”

Sold

For inquiries, please contact:
MA Doran Gallery
3509 S. Peoria Avenue | Tulsa, OK 74105 | 918.748.8700

On view Nov 6, – Dec 5, 2021
The Volland Store, 24098 Volland Road, Alma, KS

Exhibition History

  • Upturned Flower that Travels, The Volland Store, 24098 Volland Road, Alma, KS (Nov 6, – Dec 5, 2021)
  • Weaving History into Art: The Enduring Legacy of Shan Goshorn, Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa, OK (October 9, 2020 – March 28, 2021)
  • On Turtle’s Back, Dunedin Fine Art Center, Dunedin, FL (Sept 13, 2019 – December 23, 2019)
  • On Turtle’s Back, Museum of Contemporary Native Art, Santa Fe NM (May 25, 2018 – January 27, 2019)
  • Holly Wilson: Talk Story, C.N. Gorman Museum, University of California-Davis (January 9 – March 16, 2018)

I'm Still Here-Detail-Holly Wilson

 

 

Paper Wings: Fearless-Holly Wilson

PAPER WINGS: FEARLESS

PAPER WINGS: FEARLESS

21”x 23” x 13”, Unique Cast Bronze with Patina

It started with looking at my children playing and making their other world, if they needed wings they would make them from paper and sticks tied together. Their masks were transforming and all-consuming for them they believed and they became the bird.

We use a mask as a facade to be the thing we sometimes can not be, to fill that spot or give us courage.

Sometimes it is the unknown that we fear so we do not step when it is the step into that unknown that we need to live and breath. The figure prepares to fly away on her paper wings. It is a leap of faith that her wings will hold. In that moment she must be fearless to take the leap.

Available

For inquiries, please contact:

The Studio
11400 Riverview | Mustang, OK 73064 | 405.308.0239

Exhibition History

  • Holly Wilson: Talk Story, C.N. Gorman Museum, University of California-Davis (January 9-March 16, 2018)

 

Carried in the Wind-Holly Wilson

Carried in the Wind

Carried in the Wind

2019, Unique Cast Bronze with Patina, 19” x  32” x 3”

Sold

For inquiries, please contact:
MA Doran Gallery
3509 S. Peoria Avenue | Tulsa, OK 74105 | 918.748.8700

Carried in the Wind-detail 2-Holly Wilson
Carried in the Wind

 

Carried in the Wind-detail-Holly Wilson
Carried in the Wind

 

Sense of Self-view 2-Holly Wilson

Sense of Self

Sense of Self

2020, Unique Cast Bronze with Patina and Geode
14” x 9.5” x 9” (set), 8” x 6” x 7.5” (boy), 8” x 6” x 9” (girl)

The sense of self is your perception of oneself and an awareness of who you truly are: your beliefs, purpose, values, and ideals. Your sense of self grounds you on your path within the world, grounding us whether in a place or our oneself. This girl and boy are not two people but oneself, two halves of a whole, a whole self. The geode reflects the same and when broken open reveals its two sides and the secrets hidden within. Here I have a girl and a boy; I see them as the feminine and masculine in us all. The figures are fitted to this one geode when they are still in wax; they are not glued but keyed to the rock that they belong to, two sides of the self, two halves of a whole. They balance in their place much like we do in our life.

Sold

Exhibition History

  • Weaving History into Art: The Enduring Legacy of Shan Goshorn, Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa, OK (October 9, 2020 – March 28, 2021)

 

Sense of Self-view 3-Holly Wilson
Sense of Self